If You Work in a Creative Industry, You Should Steal Other People’s Ideas

August 12, 2016 by R A Z G O

Just as Shakespeare lifted plots from his predecessors, young performers today ought to focus on emulating those artists they like most. That’s not to say plagiarism is excusable; it’s not. It just means that artists who are just getting started should seek to model themselves after those who have gone before.

Take it from John Cleese of Monty Python fame: “You say, ‘I’m going to write something completely new and original and very funny.’ You can’t do it. It’s like trying to fly a plane without having any lessons. You’ve got to start somewhere and the best way to start is by copying something that is really good.”


JOHN CLEESE

John Marwood Cleese is an English actor, comedian, writer and film producer. He achieved success at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and as a scriptwriter and performer on The Frost Report. In the late 1960s, he co-founded Monty Python, the comedy troupe responsible for the sketch show Monty Python’s Flying Circus and the four Monty Python films: And Now for Something Completely DifferentMonty Python and the Holy GrailLife of Brian and The Meaning of Life.